The Daily Reveille
New Whatcom, WA

Extractions by Susan Nahas
Wednesday, January 8, 1896:

Rev. BOULET made a trip to Lummi, yesterday.

John GREULICH went, yesterday to Vancouver.

Captain BYRON has started on a trip to California.

Born - To Mr. and Mrs. T. J. FOLEY, on Sunday, January 5, a son.

Martin HANSON, of Goshen, was in town, yesterday.

Mrs. HUGUENIN and son, Fred, started for New Mexico, yesterday morning.

W. E. HUMPHREY, of Seattle, is in town as attorney in the FALLON damage suits.

W. C. PETTIBONE went east over the Great Northern, today, destined for Cleveland, Ohio.

George E. GAGE has moved to the house on Garden street formerly occupied by C. B. BEESON.

Mrs. NEWMAN and daughter, mother and sister of T. G. NEWMAN, left for their home in Burlington, Iowa, on Monday, after a stay of some months.

Mrs. William BAKER and Mrs. John McBRIDE left on the Bay City last night for Los Angeles, Cal., to join their husbands at that place.

Thursday, January 9, 1896:

D. ROGERS has gone to Seattle to resume his duty as U. S. juror.

Mrs. W. E. SMITH, of Blaine, returned from a visit east, yesterday.

The letter carriers will give a social reception in Lighthouse hall on Saturday evening, January 11, in honor of Mr. Fred BRONSON on his return to his position as chief clerk in the postoffice.

A new buoy has been anchored out in front of the Cornwall mill wharf. The big anchor was brought from Frisco and the ships can now moor to it when they come in.

W. R. SYBERT took his place in the auditor's office, yesterday, as deputy, and Fred BRONSON went into the post office in his old place as chief clerk. both are experienced men in their positions.

BIRCH BAY.
-Mrs. E. BRUNS, who has been visiting friends at Enterprise, came home on Tuesday.
-The marshes around this place since the rains slightly resemble the great lakes.
-Frank HENSPETER and E. A. NICKSON are logging on a small scale.
-O. H. LEE, O. STRAND, and S. C. TRACY and son, were at the county seat on Wednesday.
January 8, 1896.
GREENHORN.

CUSTER.
-The Enterprise Cemetery business is settled now for all time to come, after a long list of meetings, court decisions, etc.
-W. R. PARKINS is improving his home during his vacation.
-Fred CREASY will build a new house on his farm before long.
-California creek was the highest during the season on Sunday night. Considerable corduroy was floated that night in this corner of the county, so the road overseers will have some work to do soon.
-The Custer shingle mill will start running again next week.
-Mrs. E. H. BRANNIN returned home last Saturday and Miss Laura went back to Fairhaven to attend school, last Friday.
ITEMIZER.

ENTERPRISE.
-Miss PALMER opened another three months term of school on Monday.
-The Cemetery Association elected the following officers on Monday night for the ensuing year: W. EVERETT, Pres.; Will WALLACE, sec.; Jacob FOZ, treas.; B. HODGSON, D. LONG and F. BRONSON, trustees.
-B. PIERCY gave a number of his friends a dance on Tuesday night which was a grand success.
-Ella HODGSON is visiting with her sister, Mrs. Harry LOPAS of Mountain View.
-George MORGAN attended the teachers' institute in Whatcom last week.
-James MORRISON, of Victoria, B. C., was visiting his sister, Mrs. JOHNSON, last week.
-George MORGAN has a force of men grubbing three acres which he is going to plant in fruit trees in the spring.
-Jay PIERCY was visiting with friends in Whatcom a few days last week.
-George MATZ, of Ferndale, was visiting with friends here on Sunday.
-The shingle mill is shut down this week for some necessary repairs but expects to start up Monday.
Jan. 8, 1896.
MOSSBACK.

MARIETTA.
-Mrs. T. FREER, Miss E. BOWEN and Mr. Frank FREER spent part of the holiday season visiting at Springfield Villa.
-Mr. Albert MOHRMAN was home on a visit to his family. He returned on Monday to his business in Tacoma.
-Mr. Fred HARVEY and family are now domiciled in their new residence on "Knob hill."
-Mr. Emery BELL of North Fork is visiting old friends in the neighborhood.
-Mr. W. J. HARRIS, agency clerk, made an official visit to the reservation on the first of the month, and ordered several needed improvements to the school building.
-Messrs. MAYHEW and VAN HORN are making a success of the fish business. They are buying for Fairhaven and Seattle firms.
-A number of the residents of this village attended the funeral of Miss Mamie ROGERS in Whatcom. Her loving disposition won for her many warm friends in Marietta, who with her parents and sisters deeply mourn her loss.
-Mr. MILTON, our new genial merchant, has forwarded a petition to Washington for the position of postmaster of this place. Mr. HAMMER, who was offered the place, declined the honor. Mr. MILTON would fill the position admirably and we hope he may be successful.
-The jam at the mouth of the river is hourly growing worse; the immense volume of water is bringing down hundred of tons of drift wood and trees it has uprooted in its mad course. Unless something is done to open a channel through them there will be untold damages to farmers living in the Nooksack valley.
January 7, 1896.
E.

MOUNTAIN VIEW.
-Miss COLEMAN came up from Whatcom on Saturday, and will commence another tern of school in the Terrel district.
-The cemetery association of Mountain View, held their annual meeting on Tuesday at H. W. POTTER's, E. LOPAS, president, and H. A. SMITH, secretary. After business was transacted, H. W. POTTER was elected president, H. A. SMITH being retained as secretary.
-Mrs. L. BUTLER, formerly of Mountain View, opened a private school in Ferndale on January 6.
-Mr. HOOVER and family, of Ferndale, arrived home from Tacoma on Tuesday.
-Married in Mountain View on New Years day at the home of the bride's mother, Miss Lizzie ANDERSON and Mr. Fred CREASY, of Custer, Rev. Dr. DILLON performing the ceremony. Mr. and Mrs. CREASY will make their home at Custer.
-On account of the river being very high Mr. D. W. ABBOTT is losing a great many of his logs, not being able to catch them at the Morrison's mill. It is to be hoped they will be able to get them at the mouth of the river.
January 8, 1896.

Friday, January 10, 1896:

C. W. BRANDON, of Seattle, has taken SHALER's place in De CHAMPLAIN's drug store.

George P. CAVE succeeds J. H. ROGERS as traveling freight and passenger agent on the Great Northern.

The shingle shipments are almost a cipher. HENRY & Sons and ABBOTT & OLSON sent two cars out yesterday.

C. WILCOX, sawyer at COOK's shingle mill on the lake, had two fingers cut off on Wednesday.

The Blade says that Mrs. Lou BROYLES has fallen heir to $250,000, part of a $3,000,000 estate in Scotland.

The three-masted schooner Joseph Russ came into port yesterday and anchored at the Cornwall mill to load lumber.

Coroner BRACKETT is moving part of his stock into the store room next to BRONSON's drug store where he will have a convenient location.

Joe ZETTLER was charged this week with removing mortgaged property from the county and has been bound over to the Superior Court in the sum of $250.

Wm. VAN HORN, of Lummi, was a visitor to the city, Thursday. He reports the Nooksack river at that point higher than he has ever seen it. M. J. CLARK's place was almost under water.

NORTH FORK.
-Born, January 1, to the wife of Jas. E. RIDDLE, a daughter.
-Mrs. Sarah E. BIRDWELL has been appointed postmistress at Keese.
-Peter OLSON came up from Whatcom last week to spend a few days on the ranch.
-The many friends of W. C. CHAPLIN, our pioneer settler, gave him a pleasant surprise on New Years Day which was also his birthday, (we won't give away his age) by dropping in on him in his bachelor quarters, and laying forth from well filled baskets, a New Years spread that - well we won't attempt to describe it. Among those present were Mr. and Mrs. E. W. OWEN, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. COMPTON, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. HARTLEY, George LONGDON, Mr. and Mrs. R. L. KLINE, who with many others made the day one long to be remembered.
Jan. 7, 1896.
OLD RELIABLE.

Saturday, January 11, 1896:

E. B. NORTON, secretary and treasurer of the Oakland Iron works, is in the city.

Mrs. C. L. FISHER, who has been visiting in Boise City for some time, has returned to Fairhaven.

George S. TRIGG has sold out his interests at West Ferndale and will leave in a few days for Ferndale, California.

ROEDER.
-The sporting fraternity met at STRANDELL & OLSON's store on New Years for the purpose of shooting for turkeys. Mr. DAVEY won three, Wm. MEADE two and Mr. STRANDELL one.
-Messrs. WILLIAMS, SWAIM [SWIM], DURR and SELBY returned from Whatcom, Saturday, where they have been attending Teacher's Institute.
-Mrs. SHINN, who has been quite ill, is now convalescent.
-Mrs. NORSTROM is very sick with pneumonia.
-The Everson people have succeeded in raising sufficient funds to continue their school three months.
January 10, '96.
CYNIC.

Sunday, January 12, 1896:

R. U. LEITCH, of Sumas, is on the Bay.

L. R. ABBOTT of Nooksack has the quinsy.

M. G. SCOUTEN went to Blaine, yesterday.

Mrs. P. T. HARTLEY and her son G. B. NUTT left, yesterday, for Pittsburg.

Mrs. Dwight DARLING, of Everett, is visiting relatives in Fairhaven.

George WEBBER, customs officer at Port Townsend, is in the city.

Born, to Mr. and Mrs. L. B. KOEING, living near Everson, a son, on January 9th.

F. MERRILL, of the Mt. Baker Shingle Mill company, was in the city, yesterday attending a meeting of the millmen.

J. W. SEFTON, of Nooksack, offers ten dollars towards the construction of a flax mill at Whatcom as contemplated by the Board of Trade.

First Regiment orchestra of Seattle, will give a grand concert and dance at the Lighthouse theatre, Thursday night, January 16. Admission to concert and dance 50 cents.

E. W. PURDY made a written request to the county commissioners, yesterday, to have the treasurers books for the past year gone over by an expert accountant. Mr. PURDY states in his letter as the reason for making the demand that it is in the interests of good government to have the system inaugurated of employing competent accountants to pass on official books at the end of each year.

J. T. MEAD, of Roeder, died on Friday morning at 3 o'clock and was buried yesterday afternoon in Nooksack cemetery. Pneumonia with complications of heart failure carried him off. He was about 57 years old and an old resident of the county and one of the prominent farmers of the Nooksack valley. He owned a farm of his own and worked Capt. ROEDER's fine farm. A delegation of the Masons from the Bay attended the funeral.

Advertised Letters.
New Whatcom, Wash. Jan., 10, 1896.
Peter BAKER, Charlie BAER, J. E. EVANS, John H. FIELD, Miss Lottie GRANT, Miss Belle GRIFFIN, G. A. GURNEA, W. B. GILBERT, Mrs. B. L. HUSCHRIE, David HAYES, Miss Maggie D. HAYES, M. C. HARVEY, Mrs. Mary McKNIGHT, T. D. McMILLAN, John All SMITH, John SHEEHAN, Otis WYSONG, James WALSH, Fred WILCOX.
Geo. W. BOYD, Postmaster.

Mrs. F. G. UNDERWOOD died in Milwaukee on Jan. 6, of consumption.

COURT NOTES.
-Two divorces were granted, yesterday, in the cases of ACORN vs. ACORN and SEARS vs. SEARS.
-D. BUNNING appeared in the superior court, yesterday, and pleaded guilty to taking wood from school land without authority and was fined $50.

Tuesday, January 14, 1896:

Mrs. E. S. McCORD, of Fairhaven left Sunday for a visit to her parents, in Richmond, Ky. Mr. McCORD accompanied her as far as Seattle.

A. L. BLACK, A. S. COLE, W. J. MALLOY, G. H. WESTCOTT, J. H. JONE, R. S. LAMBERT, O. B. BARBO and Eli WILKIN, went down to attend the immigration convention at Seattle, yesterday.

Sunday morning about one o'clock Peter OLSEN lingered too long listening to the seductive gurgle of a quart bottle, went into a trance at the music, hit himself in the right eye and the next day paid a fine of $8.50 to Police Judge BROYLES for his fun.

George H. ALEXANDER and E. A. HEGG were passengers yesterday, to San Francisco. They have been doing some very excellent work in the photogravure line in Whatcom and will pursue the work in the wider California field. The fine views ordered by the Fairhaven Land company were made by them.

Died Suddenly.
J. R. LEFEVRE, father of Mrs. Dr. MARKLEY, died at his home, 2170 D street, on Saturday night at 12 o'clock. His illness was heart failure and the attack lasted but a few minutes. He awoke at 11 o'clock with a slight headache and pain in the stomach. He was subject to occasional attacks of indigestion, and after his illness had continued for a few minutes his wife ran up for Dr. MARKLEY. The doctor gave some simple remedies and in ten minutes he felt better, when suddenly, without a second's warning, his heart was paralyzed and he died instantly without a struggle. Deceased was 61 years of age, a native of Pennsylvania, and came here last summer from western Nebraska. The funeral took place from the home at 2 p. m. yesterday, Rev. C. C. COOK preaching the sermon, after which the cortege took the street cars for Bay View cemetery. The surviving family are Mrs. LEFEVRE, Mrs. Dr. MARKLEY, Mrs. J. D. PROUTY, of Ten Mile, and Fred C., who lives in Nebraska. Deceased was a man who was very highly respected by those who knew him.

C. S. POAGE of the Sumas Vidette, was in the city, yesterday.

Miss Helen GHARRETT returned on Saturday from a month's visit in Illinois.

Dr. BIRNEY and J. S. BURROWS are delegates to the grand lodge Knights of Pythias from Sehome lodge No. 62. John H. SARGENT represents Sunset lodge No. 11.

Good girl wanted, Mrs. C. W. DORR, 620 Garden street.

Thomas MONAHAN was knocked off a derrick at the Everson bridge on Sunday and nearly killed. He was working twenty feet from the ground when he was knocked insensible by a block from above. He struck some rods half way down, lightening his fall somewhat. He was brought into town yesterday, and although able to sit up was very badly injured on head, shoulder and sides.

These officers were installed for the ensuing year at the meeting of the Royal Arch Masons, on Saturday night. W. C. WILCOX, M. E. H. P.; W. O. NICHOLSON, E. K.; L. H. HADLEY, E. S.; C. DIBBLE, Treas.; J. W. RAYBURN, Sec.; C. W. DORR, L. of H.; J. B. DAWSON, P. S.; W. J. SIMONDS, R. A. C.; H. E. HADLEY, M. 3rd V.; L. L. WORK, M. 2 V.; J. P deMATTES, M. 1 V.; E. B. ESTABROOK, Tyler.

The County Poor Farm.
The Superintendent has written to the State Land commission regarding the so called county poor farm, the quarter section located on both sides of the plank road at the bend about 9 miles north, and also about a lot on the corner of 12th and Knox streets, Fairhaven. The county poor farm was the property of Peter GALLIGER. He died without heirs in 1878 and no heirs have appeared for so far. It is a fine farm. Thomas WYNN was administrator and the land escheated to the state for the use of the schools of Whatcom county according to the code of 1881, says the superintendent. This week a farmer near the land came in to buy the timber on the quarter as next summer it will be surrounded by burning slashings and the fire will run all over it. It was found the county commissioners didn't have any authority in the matter and that the State Land commission had it all in their hands. The lot in Fairhaven spoken of was valued once at $5000, and belonged to Wm. YATES, who died in 1883. Chas. DONOVAN was the administrator and it is in the same situation.

Wednesday, January 15, 1896:

O. P. JACKSON, the Byron house landlord is rather under the weather.

P. BELLEW, yesterday, moved his family and household goods to Blaine.

Fred KLINE has gone to Ladner's Landing with his family and all his worldly possessions.

Born - To Mr. and Mrs. S. BRIGGS, of the Queen restaurant, on Monday, a daughter.

Mrs. T. WAGNER is suffering from the effects of a badly scalded hand caused by the tipping over of a pan of hot water.

It was one degree below zero last night at 9 o'clock.

A Negro was arrested and fined $25 yesterday, for stealing silverware from the Great Northern restaurant. He was not an employee of the place. The silverware, found in his possession had the owners name on it.

ROEDER.
January 12, 1896.
-Mr. DURR's school opened on Monday for a two months' term.
-Mr. V. A. ROEDER is opening a ditch across "Moully's neck" to shorten the course of the Nooksack.
-Mr. SHINN, Everson's popular agent, returned from Goshen a few days since with a very fine blooded dog.
-Mr. J. T. MEAD, who was sick with typhoid fever, died Thursday night about three o'clock. He was in bed but a few days. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. I. WHEELIS, of the Presbyterian church Saturday afternoon. After the sermon the Masons took charge of the funeral. He was buried in Nooksack cemetery.
-Mrs. William REAMS, who has been sick for a few days, is feeling much better.
-Mrs. STRANDELL, wife of our popular merchant, gave birth to a fine little girl, last Monday night.
-The section houses at Everson were burned, Wednesday night, to prevent them being carried down stream.
-Mr. SHUMWAY, member of our school board, was sitting on the "deer chase" jury a few day's last week.
CYNIC.

Thursday, January 16, 1896:

Mrs. J. B. BRISBOIS, who has been quite sick, is reported improving.

Frank O'NEIL is walking lame to and from his jury duties as a result of an attack of rheumatism.

Miss Mary KESSINGER, one of Mt. Vernon's teachers, is visiting this week with Mr. and Mrs. C. A. HORST.

H. L. COTTELL, formerly agent at Ferndale, went to Harrington, yesterday, as relief agent.

The Bellingham has fitted up a neat cigar stand in a corner of the office for the convenience of its guests.

Philip CLARKE, son of M. J. CLARKE of Lummi, is doing well in San Francisco where he is learning to be a machinest in a first class shop.

The Y. M. C. A. debt of some hundred of dollars was nearly half paid off during last year, and the directors think it can be wiped off the slate this year.

Harry T. GOODFELLOW made his declaration of intention to forsake the allegiance of Queen Vic and become a citizen.

FERNDALE.
-George MYERS left for his home in San Francisco, on Tuesday, where he will remain for the present.
-Mrs. HARNDON left this week for Michigan, where she was called to the bedside of her mother, who is at the point of death.
-Mr. McINTYRE, of Illinois, is holding meetings in the Terrel school house. Much interest is manifested.
-New officers were elected in the Ferndale Congregational Sunday School on Sunday last. Mr. A. ROGERS, superintendent; Mrs. L. BUTLER, assistant; Miss E. MURRAY, secretary; Miss L. MORRISON, assistant; Mr. C. McDOUGAL, treasurer.
-On Thursday last a number of the old soldiers and their wives met at the home of Mr. MORSMAN, who is confined to the house by sickness, and the men cut up several ricks of wood, while their good wives were quilting and preparing a good dinner. An old-fashioned jolly time was theirs.
-Wallace SISSON, who went to California for his health several months ago, has returned not much improved.
-Mr. LANG, brother of Will LANG, formerly of this place, is here on a visit from Santa Cruz, Cal. He is stopping with Harry LOPAZ, who has charge of his brother's place.
-Z. ROBBINS and family left here about a month ago, telling no one their destination, but he has finally turned up in Santa Cruz, Cal. He left his place, 80 acres of land, which will probably go by the board.

Frank GANNON and his partner are hewing their way through the jam at the mouth of the Nooksack. Some of the Indians from the village are helping them as the late flood went in back of their village and it began to look dangerous in the vicinity of their houses. A narrow channel will be cut through the center in a short time.

Friday, January 17, 1896:

W. A. HARDY, formerly a Fairhaven druggist, is in the city.

M. A. BARRICLAW, the Blaine constable, came down, yesterday.

Miss Annette ALTSHULER started for her home in Frisco, yesterday.

G. D. HUTCHINSON, of Le Roy, N. Y., is visiting with Mr. and Mrs. E. T. NOBLES this week.

Mrs. A. WILSON is enjoying a visit from her mother, Mrs. J. AITKIN, of Custer.

A marriage license was granted, yesterday, to Randolph CURRY and Stella May BEELER, both is this city.

George DELIUS and nine members of the First Regiment band came in yesterday morning on the State.

George W. TRUMAN's case is next on the calendar for trial and will probably be reached today. TRUMAN is charged with forgery and as he had no attorney the court designated Phil. LAWRANCE to attend his case.

The Bellingham billiard tables have been moved into the large, comfortable room behind the hotel office. J. L. THATCHER is the new manager of the billiard parlor and the cigar stand which has also been moved.

Randolph CURRY and Miss Stella May BEELER were married on Wednesday night at the home of Miss BEELER's parents on C street. Rev. CROCKETT married them. They will live at Goshen.

J. M. DARLING, city treasurer of Fairhaven asked the city council on Tuesday night to lower his bond from $15,000 to $10,000. The council were inclined to be captious over the matter and Mr. DARLING promptly resigned. The office only pays $25 per month.

NORTH FORK.
-James PAINE has moved his family back to the farm.
-Mrs. J. C. COMPTON has taken charge of the boarding house at Walter PARKER's mill.
-Merchant JOHNSON, of Deming, is off with his family on a month's vacation to Oregon.
-A pack trail has been opened out up the Middle Fork to the mouth of Clear Water creek.
-Ben OWENS, son of E. W. OWENS of Hollingsworth, has arrived with his family from Iowa and will make this his future home.
January 15, 1896.
OLD RELIABLE.

LYNDEN.
-Harrison CAVENDER is spending a few days at home.
-Mrs. LEAVITT is the guest of her daughter, Mrs. EDSON.
-M. E. RITENBERG is building a large addition to his house.
-Wm. DALY is excavating for a cellar, preparatory to enlarging his house.
-Mrs. CRABTREE was stricken with paralysis last Saturday, and is lying in a very critical condition at the home of C. L. HAMILTON.
-Miss Mary CAVENDER is at home after an extended visit in Whatcom and among the islands.
-At the council meeting Tuesday evening, the retiring mayor, L. W. WELLMAN, inducted into office his successor, E. EDSON, and councilmen Chas. VINUP and A. R. SMITH. O. P. WOODY was chosen to fill the place on the council made vacant by the elevation of Mr. EDSON to the chair. Treasurer BEAVERS took the oath of office and filed his bond. ....
January 15, 1896.
L.

Saturday, January 18, 1896:

Mr. and Mrs. George HUNT, of Custer, were in town yesterday.

In the assault case from Wickersham, Joseph BLACK was brought in guilty by the jury.

George W. TRUMAN is on trial now before the superior court for forgery in Blaine. His case will go to the jury today, probably.

The new postoffice will have a frontage of fifty feet on Elk street. Preparations are being made to put in new boxes and the new office will be more conveniently arranged than the present one.

Election of Officers. Last Saturday night the Grand Army boys and the Women of the Relief Corps in Lynden had a joint installation of officers. The following persons were installed by Installing Officer A. J. RUSCO of the G. A. R.:
Chas. VINUP, Commander; G. N. ODELL, Vice Com., J. S. WRIGHT, Sr. Vice; J. C. SPAULDING, Q. M. Adjt; T. R. PRICE, Chap.; P. ROHRBACKER, Officer of Day; J. F. WOODY, Officer of Guard; Hugh BRECKENRIDGE, Surgeon.
The officers of the Relief Corps were installed by Installing Officer Chas. VINUP. They were:
Mrs. J. M. HILTON, president; Mrs. J. F. WOODY, Sr. Vice; Mrs. RUNYAN, Jr. Vice; Mrs. Nellie NACE, treasurer; Mrs. J. E. RUSCO, secretary; Mrs. BRECKENRIDGE, chapter (sic); Mrs. VINUP, conductor; Mrs. RAMSDELL, assistant conductor.

MOUNTAIN VIEW.
-Mrs. C. T. COWDEN, of Seattle, is visiting relatives and friends in Ferndale and vicinity.
-Mrs. James ZIMMERMAN, who came up from Seattle to spend the holidays with his (sic) brother, has returned to Seattle.
-There was a pleasant gathering at the home of P. M. RUTTLERs last evening to assist in a little home mission work.
-There was a social dance at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Will MANNING last evening.
-There will be a grand ball at G. A. R. hall on Friday night, January 21. Music by COWDEN, DUFFNER and COWDEN; tickets 50 cents; supper by Mrs. ROUNDS, 50 cents per couple. A splendid time is anticipated.
-Mr. GROWEN is building fences on the road side and clearing, burning and otherwise improving his home.
-Henry SISSON returned with his brother, Wallace, from California, and is visiting relatives and friends here and in Whatcom. He is not in love with California to any great extent.
January 16. 1896.
IVY

VAN WYCK.
-Born, to the wife of Isaac BACCUS, January, a daughter.
-L. N. FELMLEY killed a fine deer a few days ago.
-Mr. POWELL has built himself a fine house on the SAUNDERs place.
-Mrs. C. O. MANSON, who has been quite ill for several days, is reported as improving.
-Miss Etta NOON returned from Delta last week, where she has been visiting with friends.
-William STUART returned from Port Blakely, Wednesday, where he had been visiting his brother.
-Mr. Gus BELLMAN's new hot-house is nearing completion, and is an improvement that from its substantial nature is a credit to Mr. B. and the enterprise he is engaged in. The building consists of two apartments. First, a storage and furnace room, 20x60 feet, heated by three furnaces. The glass alone cost considerably over $200. A few more such buildings and it won't be necessary to send to California for our early vegetables.
Jan. 17, 1896.
RECLUSE.

Sunday, January 19, 1896:

M. McLAIN has returned to Whatcom to live.

W. O. DOUGLAS, of South Bay, is a Whatcom visitor.

E. C. MILLION, a leading attorney of Mt. Vernon, is in the city.

E. P. STANLEY has returned from a few week's business trip to B. C.

Miss Maude ANDERSON is ill at her home in York addition.

Tim KERSHAW is making a trip round the county collecting personal taxes.

Born - to Mr. and Mrs. HAYNES, a daughter on Wednesday, January 22nd.

J. H. PARKER left yesterday via the N. P. for a short business trip to Buffalo, New York.

Jack LEEDY pulled out for the gold excitement area at Point Roberts, yesterday.

A. BANIN (sic) and wife went to Custer, yesterday, to spend Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. E. H. BRANIN.

J. C. CLINTON, proprietor of the Farmer and Fruit Grower, came over on the Buckeye last night from Friday Harbor. He returns tomorrow.

Prof. A. C. VAIL, of the Lynden schools, will preach in the Christian church this morning. In the evening the pastor and Rev. D. ROSS, of the Presbyterian church, will exchange pulpits.

Rumors and then more rumors and still more rumors come of the gold discovery at Point Roberts. There is a big indefinite excitement and some placer claim filings have been made.

Grand Master Jerre FORTAIN, of the I. O. O. F. and E. A. Partridge, editor of the Washington Oddfellow, met the members of North Star Lodge No. 120, Whatcom Lodge No. 31 and Rebekah Lodge No. 43, last night at Kirkpatrick hall. Addresses were made by the grand master and the editor and at 9 o'clock a general social with music, dancing and varied refreshments began and lasted till midnight.

George W. TRUMAN was found guilty of forgery, yesterday, on the first ballot. When told that the jury had arrived at a verdict he said he knew what it was and he was right in his guess.

Miss Clara SMITH was surprised by a party of her friends at her home in York addition on Friday night. The party met at Mr. John COSGROVE's and went in a body to the house. Cards, music, refreshments, etc., made up a much enjoyed evening.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Tuesday, January 28, 1896:

T. H. ALLISON and family have gone to Pittsburgh, Pa., to reside.

Miss DeHAVEN takes Miss Mamie ROGERS' place in the postoffice.

Will and James IZETT, loggers of Whidbey Island, are in the county looking over timber lands.

The Whatcom Falls Mill company shipped three cars of lumber and shingles east yesterday.

Jim COX was given three months in jail or twenty-four hours to leave town yesterday. He left.

J. J. BELL and W. A. PARKER went to Walla Walla yesterday with George TRUMAN who goes there for five years.

Miss Laura CADE returned to her home in Seattle yesterday. She has just finished a term of school at Keyes [Keese].

Wm. BELKLE was set free by the verdict of a federal jury in Judge HANFORD's court on Saturday. He was one of the parties charged with passing the counterfeit gold pieces.

Archie ARNOLD, at Alki on the Guide Meridian road, lost half of three front fingers of his right hand yesterday on a double block shingle saw. Dr. MARLEY and Dr. BRIGGS dressed the wound, amputation of all three fingers being necessary.

H. A. MOORE's house on the lake was burned on Friday night while he and his wife were at the Pioneer's meeting at this place. This is the second time within a year he has been burned out. The insurance was held by A. J. McARTHUR.

John SCHNEIDER was given five days in jail yesterday by Judge ANDERSON for chastising his wife because he thought she needed it. He was taken to jail and said when put in that he expected his wife would come around and pay his fine and get him out.

BIRCH BAY.
-Orrin LEWIS is busy pulling out the stumps around his barn.
-George CHAMBERLIN is engaged in the same good work.
-Fred TARTE and Amel SELIN were frightened by a cougar following them last Saturday evening for over a half mile. Although he came close he did not attack them but kept up a continual scream.
January 27, 1895 [1896]
GREENHORN.

ROEDER.
-Mr. James BACUS was out from Whatcom to look after his ranch last week.
-Herschel ROBINSON, who has been having a severe attack of sore eyes, and Mr. PARKER's four boys, who were out of school all last week on account of the same trouble, are also getting better.
-Mr. A. WILLIAMS, the popular teacher of Gera, was calling on his many friends in this place Saturday and Sunday.
-Mr. Al. TUCKER went to his ranch on the North Fork Thursday.
-Mrs. COLLINS is expecting her father and mother from Yakima.
-Mr. Wm. REAMS has been smoking meat all of the past week. He has about two tons.
-Charles and Ed. KALE, who returned home from Weiser shingle miss two weeks since, will not return until winter is over.
January 27, 1896.
CYNIC

The Pioneers.
The Pioneers at their meeting in the Stenger block on Friday night effected a temporary organization with C. E. CLINE as president; Mrs. Wm. POWELL, vice; J. T. LIKINS, sec.; Louis STENGER, treas.; Mrs. HOFFERCAMP, H. A. MOORE, Jacob MATZ and John STENGER, together with the foregoing officers, executive committee. The bylaws for a permanent organization will be drawn up by these officials and passed on at the next meeting. .... It is intended to have a meeting winter and summer, one a clam bake, the other a dance with accompaniments. Auxiliary branches will be formed in the county and there are lively times ahead in pioneer circles.

It was Ordered by the county commissioners on the 21st of January that the following named persons be and they are hereby selected and designated to serve as petit jurors for the ensuing year:

LIST OF PETIT JURORS.
ACORN, A. B.
ADAMS, W. S.
AITKEN, John
ALLEN, W.
ALLEN, W. C.
AMES, Geo. H.
ANDERSON, A.
ANDERSON, Chas.
ANDERSON, H. G.
ANDERSON, Michael
ANDERSON, O. H.
ARMGARDT, Robt.
AUSTIN, J.
BACUS, H.
BAER, Wm.
BAILEY, Carr
BALL, Isaac
BARNHOLT, Geo.
BARRETT, S. E.
BARRON, Henry
BARTLETT, W.
BARTRUFF, D. E.
BASS, D. H.
BASS, Samuel
BATTERSBY, P. S.
BEACH, S. H.
BENNETT, A. T.
BENSON, A.
BERTHUSON, H. C.
BIRDWELL, S. H.
BLACK, Geo. A.
BLANKENSHIP, J. A.
BLATSTONE, Jas.
BOOTH, G. W.
BOOTH, W. C.
BRAITHWAITE, H.
BRECENKRIDGE, R. C.
BROCK, V. S.
BROKAW, I. V.
BROWN, Ed
BROWN, H.
BROWN, H. M.
BRUNS, John
BRYAN, Geo. D
BURFIEND, Richard
BURGESS, S. R.
BURNS, Robt.
BUTLER, H. M.
BYE, Alfred
BYRNE, W. J. M.
BYRON, H. C.
CADE, I. E.
CAIN, A. J.
CAIN, James
CALKINS, E.
CAMPBELL, Allen
CAMPBELL, Donald
CARTER, W. W.
CARVER, O. P.
CHAPPELL, J. G.
CLARKE, Thomas
CLINE, C. E.
COFFMAN, J. T.
COLEMAN, Selden
COLLEY, Frank C.
COLLINS, J. Y.
COMSTOCK, L. G.
CONNELLY, Edward
CORNISH, R. D.
COUNTRYMAN, L. C.
COWGILL, E. L.
CREASEY, Geo.
CREEGAN, Miles
CURTIS, C. D.
CUSTER, J. D.
DAHL, C. H. J.
DAHLMER, J.
DAKIN, H. J.
DAVID, L. W.
DAY, E. P. Y.
DEAN, C.
DECKER, Joseph
DEEDS, James
DeFRIES, John
DEMENT, G. D.
DeWITT, Henry
DIBBLE, Carmi
DONNELL, John O
DORAN, James
DORR, W. H.
DOUGLASS, Steve
DRAKE, L. D
DUNNAGAN, D.
DYER, J. C.
EAGER, W. H.
ECKARDT, W. A.
EDSON, Ed
EDWARDS, Thos. H.
ELDER, T. J.
ESTERBROOK, W. H.
ESTERGREEN, A. E.
EVERETT, B. W.
FILMORE, M. A.
FOLLIS, W. T.
GAGE, Geo. E.
GALBRAITH, A. A.
GARNESS, O. N.
GAUDETTE, Edward
GEORGE, Edward
GETCHELL, Dennis
GETTY, John
GILL, C. R.
GILLESPIE, W. J.
GOOCH, W. G.
GOODE, E. F.
GOODELL, Samuel
GOODING, M.
GRAY, E. C.
GREEN, C. H.
GRUELICH, John
GWINNUP, P. B.
HALL, W. Finley
HAMILTON, M. A.
HANSARD, C. T.
HARDEMAN, J. B.
HARKNESS, C.
HARKNESS, Thos.
HART, A. B.
HAWLEY, R. E.
HAYES, R. R.
HEDGE, Wm.
HENRY, J. S.
HENRY, W. J.
HENSPETER, F. E.
HENSPETER, Henry
HICKS, J. A.
HICKS, Lyle
HILL, J. C.
HODGES, T.
HOFFMAN, Henry
HOLLINGSWORTH, Jos.
HOLMAN, S. E.
HOPKINS, E. R.
HOSKINS, C. C.
HUGHES, S. P.
JACKSON, Thos.
JEFFERSON, Jacob
JEFFRIES, N. K.
JENKINS, D. C.
JENKINS, F. M.
JERNS, N.
JOHNSON, C. F.
JOHNSON, L. P.
JONES, H. F.
JONES, J. L.
KING, Joseph
KNOX, Robert
KRIETER, J. T.
LANE, F. F.
LARKHART, W.
LATHROP, C. T.
LAW, J. W.
LOGSDON, C. M.
LOOMIS, A. J.
LOOP, A. B.
LOPAS, Edwin
LOVE, Ben F.
LUTZ, Chas. Sr.
MAIOR, F. G.
MANLEY, John
MARKHART, J. D.
MARSH, M. J.
MASON, J. H.
McCUSH, D.
McDONALD, Michael
McKEE, D. C.
MEAD, G. W.
MERRILL, H. L.
MERRITT, J. N.
MILHOLLIN, J. H.
MILLER, E. L.
MILLER, W. F.
MILLER, W. L.
MITCHELL, James
MONROE, D. G.
MOORE, C. R.
MOORE, H. A.
MORSMAN, W. H.
MUNRO, J. A.
MUNSON, H. L.
MYERS, Wm.
NELSON, Paul
NESTELLE, L. W.
NOON, W. T.
NORDROM, C.
NORTH, W. H.
NOSTRAND, C. W.
NUGENT, Henry
NULLE, W. D.
OESER, Henry
ORR, Robert
OSGOOD, G. C.
OWEN, E. W.
PANNINGTON, M.
PARKER, J. W.
PARR, Wm.
PAUL, C.C.
PETERSON, A. W.
PETERSON, H. B.
PEYATT, Henry
PHILLIPS, C. A.
PICKNEY, W. H.
PITMAN, L. D.
POLSON, Louis
POPE, William
PORTER, J. A.
POTTER, Hiram
POWELL, C. H.
PRATT, H. H.
PROUTY, E. S.
RAMEY, G. W.
RAY, Wm. G.
REID, R. B.
REINHART, S. D.
RICHARDSON, T. L.
RICE, D. E.
RIDDLE, J. M.
RILEY, Wm.
ROBERTS, F. E.
RODGERS, A. A.
ROGERS, Ellery
ROLL, J. K.
RONEY, C.
ROSS, Donald
SAAR, Peter
SCRIMSHER, C. G.
SCOTT, E. E. A.
SEANOR, Lewis
SEFTON, J. Y.
SEIMMONS, R. H.
SHAW, John
SHOWERS, John W.
SHUMWAY, S. T.
SIMONDS, W. J.
SIMPSON, R. S.
SITZER, C. E.
STANGROOM, John
SLATER, Geo. Jr.
SLATER, John
SMITH, G. T.
SMITH, H. S.
SMITH, J. S.
SMITH, S. C.
SMITH, T. M.
SPENCER, J. B.
STEARNS, Rufus
STEPHENS, T. H.
STODDARD, J. H.
STONE, M. M.
STOWELL, C. C.
STREETER, Wm.
SWANSON, Chas.
SWIM, W. J.
TAPPING, S. P.
TARTE, J. W.
TAYLOR, Allen
TAYLOR, J. H.
TEMPLIN, H. W.
TEMPLIN, I. C.
THOLE, Frank
THOMPSON, Jacob
THOMPSON, R. M.
TINLING, Robt.
TOBIASSON, A. T.
TODD, S. L.
TOLEST, W. M.
TRACY, S. C.
TRIMBELL, E.
TRIMBLE, E. T.
TUFFRY, J. C.
VAIL, W. S.
VAN HOUTEN, W. J.
VAN ZANDT, J. M.
WAHL, John
WALL, Ed
WALSON, F. M.
WARRENER, A. H.
WEST, P.
WESTCOTT, P. F.
WESTMAN, G. S.
WESTMAN, P.
WHEELON, M.
WILLIAMS, Ira
WILLIAMS, W. J.
WHALEN, M.
WOODARD, S. M.
WORTHEN, G. W.
WRIGHT, A. H.
ZOBRIST, Peter
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Thursday, February 20, 1896:

Melville Gage WERDEN died yesterday at his residence on C street at 1 o'clock. He was a brother of Doctor WERDEN, and among the other immediate relatives left to mourn his loss are his wife and a sister in Ontario and another brother in San Francisco. The deceased was born 59 years ago in Picton, Ontario. Raised on a farm near the shores of Lake Ontario till he was 17 years old, he went to Australia and was there for three years. Returning to Ontario, he married Miss Phebe McDONALD of Picton. They came to the coast in 1863. From 1873 to 1880 they lived in Coos Bay, Oregon, and were in San Francisco from 1880 till 1889, when they came to Bellingham Bay. While in San Francisco Mr. WERDEN was troubled with an abscess in his side, but on coming here he felt much improved in health for some time. Lately he had a slight return of the old trouble, and this with other complications, principally throat trouble, carried him off. The funeral will take place from the residence, 1425 C street, on Friday at 2 p.m. Short services will be conducted by Rev. H. ALLING at the house and interment will be made in Bay View cemetery.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Saturday, February 22, 1896:

The body of Mrs. H. A. PAUS arrived from Portland in the charge of relatives yesterday. The funeral will take place on Sunday at 2 p. m. from the residence on Elk street. After the services, the arrangement of which will be announced later, the cortege will proceed to Bay View cemetery where the interment will take place.

NOTICE.
We have purchased the Coal and Wood business of George NELSON, and have plenty of Blue Canyon and British Columbia Coal, with stack of elegant Dry wood, which we desire to see for cash, as our terms are cash with orders or on delivery.
DICKINSON BROTHERS.

The funeral services of Mr. M. G. WERDEN were held at the residence, 1425 C street, at 2 p. m. yesterday. They were conducted by Rev. H. ALLING who made a short address. The funeral cars, which were under the charge of Mr. W. H. BRACKETT, then carried the deceased to the Bay View cemetery where he was laid to rest.

House Burned.
Mrs. E. E. BRYANT's house, known as the old Commercial hotel, just behind ABBOTT & OLSEN's grocery store on Elk street was burned to the ground just before daylight yesterday morning. Very little of the furniture was saved. Mrs. BRYANT, who lives alone, was asleep when the fire started and was awakened by the smoke which nearly suffocated her before she got out. When the fire companies arrived the building was beyond saving and burned rapidly down. It is not known how the fire originated. A. E. JONES held the insurance on the house and contents to the amount of $750.

ANDERSON & Co. have already commenced work on the 8 3/4 miles of the Everson and Goshen plank road. They will sublet most of the work and yesterday they sublet half a mile to one party. The work is said to be all dry work and in that respect very different from the Guide Meridian which was a mortar bed while being built. There are only two swamps on this road and the building will be that much easier and pleasanter. The contractors want a force of from 75 to 100 men on their own part of the work. I was said yesterday by a contractor who had been in town for a number of days trying to hire men, that it was very hard to get men to work just now. Between the shingle mills, saw mills, logging camps and farm work, nearly every man who really wanted heavy work was busy and men of that description could not be got in the vicinity of Bellingham Bay.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Tuesday, February 25, 1896:

W. D. WILLIAMS, living near the Columbia school, is under the weather owing to heart affliction.

Charles RAYMOND, special agent of the Sun Insurance Co., is in the city adjusting the Mrs. E. E. BRYANT loss.

Chas. CARLSON is building a residence at the corner of 22nd and C streets. It will be splendidly finished inside as he is doing the work himself.

Mr. STRANDELL of the firm of STRANDELL & OLSON, merchants of Roeder, was in the city yesterday on his way to Seattle to purchase his spring stock.

D. H. DeCAN has bought an interest in the CLARK shingle mill company at Ferndale. Sam BARRETT has sold his interest in the same mill to J. B. HATCH.

On Saturday, February 22nd, Mr. E. A. HEGG and Mrs. Ella SANCLAIR were quietly married at the residence of Rev. Donald ROSS by that obliging clergyman.

Rev. W. A. MACKEY preached his farewell sermon at Fairhaven on Sunday night. He goes to Tacoma to take charge of a pastorate there. His family will remain in Fairhaven till the end of the school year.

Doctor MARKLEY was called out to attend William WEBB at he Meridian mill Saturday. He is a logger and while at work in the woods his leg was broken, two bones near the ankle being smashed making a very awkward break.

The Last of Earth.
    Mrs. E. E. WHITE died suddenly on Saturday evening at 7 o'clock. She was attacked with the grip a number of days before but on Friday night had so far recovered as to be around. A relapse on Saturday was fatal although two physicians were in attendance. She was born on January 2, 1865, and was married to Mr. WHITE in Ohio. They came to the Coast about five years ago and have lived in Whatcom ever since. Last year they moved into the neat little cottage on the corner of L and Twenty-second streets and in a home of their own with two bright boys, one nine and the other eleven, and with no shadow on the horizon the future was tinted with hope's brightest colors.
    The city schools were closed yesterday that the teachers and pupils might attend the funeral. The Knights of Pythias, of which Mr. WHITE is a member, attended in a body and a large crowd of sympathizing friends were present. The high school pupils were there in a group and as far as sorrow was concerned were part of the family of Principal WHITE. Rev. W. B. McMILLEN made a short address at the house and a quartette, Mrs. TRIMBLE, Miss KORTHAUER and Messers. ESTABROOK and PARK in soft melody bade farewell to her who slept. The draped casket was covered with wreaths and delicate blossoms and was carried by Supt. PATTISON, Prof. SELBY and part of the high school graduating class to the cars; the long procession of teachers, pupils, knights in regalia and friends following. The interment took place at Bay View cemetery where the solemn religious services were completed.

Wednesday, February 26, 1896:

J. C. LIGHTHOUSE has gone east. His daughter accompanied him.

Wanted - A middle-aged woman to keep house and care for an old gentleman. Apply to W. C. WILCOX, 1560 Holly street, city.

There are only sixty Indians over 18 years old on the Lummi reservation and they hold 12,000 acres of land.

James H. NICHOLS and Elizabeth DUPEN, both of Whatcom, were given a marriage license yesterday.

Mrs. Dr. APPLEBY received a message last night from San Francisco saying her husband was ill. He went there about a month ago to take a post graduate hospital course.

John SOFRANCO, a resident of Columbia Valley, was brought down yesterday by Deputy G. COLEMAN and was adjudged insane. The suicide wheels in his head were revolving very rapidly. He will be taken to the asylum today.

D. S. JOHNSON, the piano agent, sold a number of pianos while here. One was shipped to E. A. WADHAMS at Blaine, another went to L. DeCHAMPLAIN and A. BRANNIN bought a costly instrument. The Military club of Company F also put $480 in an instrument for their hall.

George W. LYSLE left St. Joseph's hospital at Fairhaven on Monday night at 7 o'clock and has not been heard of since. He has been there for treatment for some time and once before wandered away while in a semi delirious condition. Since it was discovered that he was gone this time the hospital authorities and police forces of the two towns have been searching for him constantly. It is feared he has wandered down towards the bay and fallen in.

The New G. A. R. Post.
At a meeting in the city hall on Monday night made up of a number of veterans it was resolved to establish a new G. A. R. post in Whatcom. George D. SMITH was elected chairman and J. BROYLES secretary of the meeting. It was resolved that because of "discordant elements in the existing G. A. R. organization of this city" a new organization has become necessary to harmonize the interests and principles of the order. The name of the new post will be "L. P. Plummer post." The following officers were elected:
John BROYLES, post commander; William McMILLAN, senior vice-commander; M. V. B. SUTHERLAND, junior vice-commander; J. C. SCOTT, chaplain; John HAGLER, officer of the day; M. H. WEYBRIGHT, quartermaster; David L. PATCHIN, guard; Alfred PHILLIPS surgeon.
A resolution was adopted inviting James B. Steadman Post, No. 24, to install the officers of Plummer post on the evening of March 7, in the old Canfield G. A. R. hall on C street. All members of the Grand Army in good standing are invited to attend the installation. There are twenty-five charter members.

ACME NOTES.
-Morris McCARTY departed last Sunday for his new location in North Carolina, going via Whatcom, where he will remain a few days before proceeding on his journey. His many friends here are sorry to lose so good a citizen and wish him success in his new home.
-The Acme Mill Company is again running full capacity and a general revival of business activity in this vicinity is noticeable.
-There was a large attendance at the lyceum last Wednesday evening and a lively entertainment. The program consisted of a trio by Messrs. G. M. and Meade JOHNSON and J. TINLING; select reading by J. MORAN; vocal medley by Mrs. HOWIE, Mrs. JOHNSON, Miss JOHNSON, Messrs. JOHNSON and TINGLING; address by D. M. JOHNSON and a debate as to who was the greater man, Abraham Lincoln or George Washington. The judges of the debate awarded their decision to the Washington debaters, but on appeal to the house it was found to be almost unanimously in favor of Abraham Lincoln. The critics report by Mrs. Thomas STEPHENS followed and showed keen perception and good judgment.
Feb. 25, 1896. SPECTATOR.

ROEDER.
-Joe RICE's baby has been quite sick.
-Wilson JONES and Susan OLESON are around again after a short illness.
-Mr. JONES is enlarging his orchard which adds greatly to the looks of his home.
-The young people who attended the surprise party given in honor of Emma SIBERT at the residence of Mrs. ABBOTT, report a very enjoyable evening.

Tuesday, March 10, 1896:

Frank JARVIS, son of J. R. JARVIS of Fairhaven is ill.

Virgil PERINGER of Clearbrook was a city visitor yesterday.

Chas. BRANIN arrived on Sunday from Chicago on a visit to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. BRANIN.

Dr. COMPTON and wife and Mr. and Mrs. H. W. KINNEY arrived home on Saturday from their California trip.

R. M. PORTER returned yesterday from Tacoma where he was taking testimony in the case of LARRABEE vs. WILSON and COWGILL.

H. C. BYRON has taken his place in BAUM's grocery store, where his wide acquaintance and experience will make him a valuable man.

Naomi FROST was divorced from her husband, Lester FROST, yesterday in the Superior court. She charges that he deserted her and is living in British Columbia.

Mr. I. A. GILMORE and a delegation from the board of trade will be present at Ferndale on Thursday afternoon to talk to the farmers of that vicinity regarding the establishment of a creamery branch at that flourishing town.

It's Colonel John BROYLES now. The latest general order, No. 6, issued from the headquarters of the G. A. R. appoints John BROYLES aid-de-camp on the national staff for the department of Washington and Alaska. The appointment carries with it the title of colonel.

Ex-Mayor A. L. BLACK and family leave today for the far east via the Southern Pacific and New Orleans. Mrs. BLACK and children will remain in the east until June and Mr. BLACK will stay about one month. While absent he will argue the Betsy JONES and the tide land cases before the U. S. Supreme court.

New G. A. R. Post.
On February 29th L. P. Plummer Post, No. 95, of the department of Washington and Alaska, G. A. R. was chartered. Last Saturday evening, March 7th, the officers of the new post were installed in Canfield hall and the new post starts out with a good membership. The members of J. B. Steadman post were present to assist at the installation as visitors and Jno P. LEWIS, post commander of J. B. Steadman post was the officer detailed to perform the installation ceremonies. The following officers were installed in due form for the remainder of this year:
John BROYLES, post commander; W. McMILLAN, Sr. V. C; M. V. B. SUTHERLAND, Jr. V. C.; F. F. THOMPSON, Chaplain; Andrew MILLER, Q. M.; S. BATEMAN, Adjutant; John HAGLER, O. D.; David PATCHIN, O. G.; Alf PHILLIPS, P. S.; Emery PROUTY, Q. M. S.; Jos. BUCHANAN, S. M.; S. H. BEACH, I. S.
After the installation ceremonies the entire company were invited up to the residence of the new post commander, where the ladies had provided a bountiful lunch and arranged for a time of general sociability that lasted till midnight. The new post will meet in the old Reveille hall on the second and fourth Saturdays in each month.

City Council Notes --
-With regard to moving Laura LOWERY'S house, STODDARD could see no valid objections to its removal. A. L. BLACK stated that there was no ordinance on the subject, that the council could do as it pleased, that a half a dozen buildings under similar circumstances had been moved, that the practice had alway been to allow buildings within the fire limits to be moved if it did not raise the rates of insurance. In this case the place of removal has one less exposure and there is no extra risk where the building was going. The permit to remove was granted by the council, Mrs. LOWERY agreeing to remove the frame building whenever a brick goes up next to it.
-J. M. FORTIER's liquor license was granted.
-The water superintendent was instructed to connect R. C. STEVEN's property at a cost of $6 and P. F. SNYDER's, on K, at cost of $12.
-Charles LUSBY was confirmed as fire policeman.
-POWELL asked that license fees paid by May HOWARD for recent entertainment be reduced, as they had not been financially successful. Referred.
-G. W. HARKNESS was appointed sewer inspector, to charge $1 for each connection.
-The pay for city labor was raised to the old rate of 20 cents per hour.

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